Cholesterol & Eggs

Eggs do have cholesterol, about 186 mg in a large egg to be exact. But despite the long-standing belief that this would then lead to high blood cholesterol, that may not be the case at all! This belief, or myth, as some have termed it, has been largely debunked by a slew of more recent, and more credible, studies.

The original research that linked eggs and other animal proteins to heart health risk, developed in the 1950s and the source of many of the American Hearth Association’s original recommendations, have been seriously questioned.

As a result, and due to a number of more credible studies showing less harm and additionally many benefits to eggs for general health, and for heart health, the U.S. Government’s Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee has made a recommendation as of February, 2015 that they drop the long-standing 300 mg of cholesterol per day guideline. This still has to be approved by the Department of Health & Human Services and the Department of Agriculture, but that seems very likely at this point.

Here is a quote from the New York Times on February 19th, 2015

The panel also dropped a longstanding recommendation that Americans restrict their intake of dietary cholesterol from foods like eggs and shrimp — a belated acknowledgment of decades of research showing that dietary cholesterol has little or no effect on the blood cholesterol levels of most people.

“For many years, the cholesterol recommendation has been carried forward, but the data just doesn’t support it,” said Alice H. Lichtenstein, the vice chairwoman of the advisory panel and a professor of nutrition science and policy at Tufts University.

Read the whole article New York Times: Nutrition Panel Calls for Less Sugar and Eases Cholesterol and Fat Restrictions.