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Meet Our Family Farmers

Just like you, our farmers believe that family comes first—and we’re proud that raising our Organic and Free Range Eggs offer them the opportunity to make a good living with a sustainable business that they can keep in the family if they wish. We’d like you to meet the people who proudly supply your eggs.



Check Out More of our Small Family Farms

Wenger Farm

Wenger Family Farm

Lancaster County, PA

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Wenger Family Farm

Lancaster County, PA


A farm evolves as its family grows

When Clyde and Regina Wenger moved into their farm in 2004, it came with a henhouse fitted with cages. It wasn’t a long relationship. “We ran one flock through with the cages, and figured out that the cages were worn out,” recalls Clyde. “So we remodeled and put in a flock of Nellie’s Cage-Free birds.”

The Wengers found that raising happier, healthier chickens was a much better fit for them—so much so that Clyde, also a stone mason, was soon laying the foundation for another, modern laying barn. Today their 40,000 hens have the run of their clean, well-furnished barns—and plenty of room to roam in a spacious outdoor access area.

The egg farm gave the family more room to grow and pursue their dreams. With Regina and their four children (ages 5-10) helping gather and pack eggs, Clyde was able to leave his stone masonry side business to farm full-time. Currently the family leases out some of its 58 acres to local crop farmers, but they hope someday to bring it all into the family fold.

“It’s a long-term goal, but our primary focus is on the farm,” he explains. “I hope some of the children take on where I leave off, when that time comes. Time brings change.”

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Dersham Family Farm

Windy Valley Poultry—Union County, PA

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Dersham Family Farm

Windy Valley Poultry—Union County, PA


Farming for the “next 100 years”

When the doors open at Matt Dersham’s hen house in the morning, the first chickens come out tentatively, poking their heads and clucking softly.

Soon they’re joined by a handful of others, then dozens—and within minutes the grassy stretch is full of noise and movement as hundreds of chickens peck at bugs, scratch, and roll in in the dirt.

“They’re having a good old time,” chuckles Matt.

It looks and sounds like an old-fashioned farm scene, but Matt’s spanking-clean cage-free hen house is full of brand-new technology. And he’s just putting the finishing touches on another one that features a state-of-the-art ventilation system and expanded roosting and nesting areas to keep his next flock of “18,000 girlfriends” even more comfortable.

The goal is to not only meet the already stringent Certified Humane standards all Pete and Gerry’s egg farmers follow, but to surpass them.

Matt is proud to be taking the 106-acre Dersham farm, which dates back to 1885, into the next century and beyond. Having a solid contract to supply Pete and Gerry’s with cage-free, organic eggs gives him the flexibility to plan ahead–no easy task for most farmers.

He’s also grateful that Pete and Gerry’s takes care of packaging, marketing, and distributing his organic eggs. “That way I can focus on doing what I’ve always dreamed of doing—just being a farmer.” Besides adding the new laying barn, he plans to expand into crop-farming to keep his land productive.

Matt looks forward to his upcoming marriage, starting a family, and having their children be a part of it all. “I’m taking the long-term view, to keep the farm going in the family,” he explains. “It’s already a centennial farm, and I’m going to make it a bicentennial one.”

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Fisher Family Farm

Lancaster County, PA

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Fisher Family Farm

Lancaster County, PA


Cleanliness is a family value

Farmer Fisher keeps his farm spotless. It’s something he learned from his parents, who were also farmers.

He was a building contractor for 20 years before returning to farming in 2004. He built a new barn on his 23-acre farm in 2008 to produce eggs for Pete and Gerry’s.

He supplements his income by renting some of his land and building furniture. The best part of his work on the farm is working side-by-side with his wife and their six children. That may be why their barns are so neat and tidy.

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E. Hoover Family Farm

Union County, PA

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E. Hoover Family Farm

Union County, PA


Born to small family farming

Farmer Hoover grew up on his farm. Except for a few years in his early twenties, he’s worked the 125-acre farm his whole life. Today he farms with his wife, and their children, and they started working with Pete and Gerry’s in 2008.

In addition to poultry, the Hoovers milk 36 cows and grow corn and hay. They love the seasonal rhythm of the farm – especially the spring planting and the fall harvest.

It’s nice, he adds, being his own boss and working with his family. For fun, he likes fixing his neighbors’ machinery. He believes there will always be opportunities for small family farms in niche markets.

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Hurst Family Farm

Berks County, PA

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Hurst Family Farm

Berks County, PA


A lifelong “drive” to farm

When Farmer Hurst was 16, his car got stuck on the steep driveway of a farm in a snowstorm. He never imagined that 17 years later he’d own that farm. The neighbor who pulled him out still lives next door.

He and his wife, bought the 121-acre farm in 1999 and built the poultry barn in 2007.  Previously, he managed a 125,000 caged-pullet farm. With the help of his father,  also raises corn.

Farmer Hurst likes working the farm and producing eggs for Pete and Gerry’s. It allows him to spend more time with his wife and five daughters.

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High Family Farm

Juniata County, PA

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High Family Farm

Juniata County, PA


All in the Family

The Highs and their five children all work the farm every day. In addition to two barns with hens in them, they also raise sheep and breed dogs, not to mention tend a very large garden. But there is still time during summer, after the chores are done, for the kids to get into the above ground swimming pool to cool off a little.

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Zook Family Farm

Snyder County, PA

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Zook Family Farm

Snyder County, PA


Raising Healthy Kids and Healthy Hens

When farmers Lee and Neila Zook built a playground for their two young sons, they knew just where to put it. It’s right next to their century-old farmhouse, and just a few hundred yards from their two organic cage-free hen houses.

“We wanted to keep everything close by, so we can keep an eye on them all,” says Neila, who considers her 36,000 layer hens part of her family. “We all breathe the same air, so why shouldn’t our chickens have a good life just like we do?”

Setting up their 200-acre family farm this way allows the Zooks to keep work and family life in happy balance. Every morning and afternoon Neila goes to her “office” for a couple of hours to pack eggs, sometimes with the boys in tow; Lee walks the barns to check on the chickens.

“We monitor everything—feed consumption, water, egg output—to make sure they’re happy and healthy,” says Lee.

Under Certified Humane standards, the birds get strictly organic feed and filtered water, with plenty of room to scratch, roost, socialize, and lay their eggs in privacy. All this loving care keeps their hens amazingly productive: From their first flock, the Zooks’ farm has averaged some the best egg yields in the industry.

A steady egg income has enabled Lee to keep the farm thriving in its fourth generation, as he crop-farms corn, soybeans and hay with his father. Best of all, they’ve been able to manage the farm themselves.

“We’re able to make a good living and still be able to do things as a family,” says Neila. “What’s more important than that?”

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Stoltzfus Family Farm

Lancaster County, PA

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Stoltzfus Family Farm

Lancaster County, PA


Caring for Hens and Cows

The Stoltzfus family has been farming for over 20 years.  With a family of five children, they care for roughly 6,000 organic hens, 44 cows, and 46 acres.

Bomgardner Family

Bomgardner Family Farm

Lebanon County, PA

Bomgardner farm steers

Bomgardner Family Farm

Lebanon County, PA


Time for Family and Farm

Greg and Katie Bomgardner’s kids are pretty typical tween/teens. They juggle school, friends, baseball, football, and soccer practice, music lessons, 4-H livestock club, horseback riding lessons, and just about every other extracurricular activity that active American kids do these days.

Oh – and they also help their mom and dad sort, wash and pack eggs almost every day.

That’s just one of many reasons why the Bomgardners chose to become Pete and Gerry’s Organic Egg farmers: They can have an active, healthy home life that the whole family can participate in. “Say, if we have a baseball game, we can wait to pack the eggs when we get home,” says Greg.  “That’s a big selling point for us, because family comes first.”

Greg works for the township during the day, checking on the hens before he leaves. Katie manages the hens, and does the bulk of sorting and packing the eggs.  The kids help when they get home from school.

“They do it in exchange for time on the Xbox,” says Greg. “It’s a great motivator!”

The family bought their 42-acre farm from Katie’s family, and live in the home she grew up in.  Besides their flock of 18,000 organic hens, they raise grass-fed steers and pigs, and crop-farm on neighboring land.  They’re eagerly planning to add a second laying barn, which will enable Greg to move more to full-time farming, a tradition the family hopes to continue.

While they’re too young to make decisions about such things, at least some of the Bomgardner kids may one day opt for the farm life, too. “They really love animals, and our second son really enjoys the equipment–he loves to use the riding mower,” muses Greg.  “I think it’s just a matter of time.”

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Ward's Pleasant View Farm

Grafton County, NH

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Ward's Pleasant View Farm

Grafton County, NH


From a Life in Dairy to a New Life With Hens

Paul grew up helping his father on their family dairy farm, and he took over operation of the farm after his father’s retirement. In the last several years, being a small dairy farmer in New Hampshire has become more and more challenging.  In 2012, Paul decided to try a new opportunity, and he built a barn for a flock of organic hens.  Now, Paul’s two sons help take care of the hens, and he hopes that someday they may take over the family farm after he retires.

Michelle Daren Good

Sparkling Waters Farm

Lancaster County, PA

Michelle Daren Good

Sparkling Waters Farm

Lancaster County, PA


A Good Balance

In today’s economy many farm families have to juggle working both on and off the farm to keep the family business thriving. At Sparkling Waters Farm, Daren and Michelle Good have found their own happy balance–with a little help from their 40,000 hens.

Daren, who grew up on a dairy farm, had worked full-time with an excavating company for several years. Then the Goods connected with Pete and Gerry’s and made the decision to go full speed ahead into organic cage-free egg farming.

“We went in headfirst, sink or swim!” he recalls. “Right off the bat we had two barns, and I’m glad we did!”  The steady income allowed Daren to become a full-time farmer, and today the Goods also raise grass-fed steers and crop-farm corn, soybeans, and hay.  Their ultra-modern laying barns stand next to their nearly 200-year old stone barn and farmhouse, a striking mix of old and new.

For her part, Michelle jokes that she leads a double life, working full-time off the farm as a program manager for alternative markets at an insurance company. “When I come home from work, I kick off my heels, put on boots, and head to the barns!” she laughs.  She helps with barn chores on weekends and on weeknights when Daren needs extra help.

“I like having the balance and the variety,” she notes.  “It’s great to have that ‘outside’ social interaction.”

The Goods also have help from Daren’s parents (“my father is in the chicken houses with me every morning,” he notes).  And of course, there’s plenty of moral support from Muzzy, their beloved dog.

“Pete and Gerry’s has been good to us,” muses Daren.  “Working with them has made it possible for us to keep our farm in the family for another generation.”

Sensenig Farm

Sensenig Family Farm

Lebanon County, PA

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Sensenig Family Farm

Lebanon County, PA


Room for hens and family to flourish

“Every flock, every bloodline has its own personality,” Nelson Sensenig says of his 18,000 hens. The “girls” have the run of two roomy, modern barns, with time outside when weather permits for sunlight, fresh air, and green grass. “They can run, they can fly, they can perch, they can scratch …or they can just sit and watch you go by,” he laughs.

The Sensenigs like to keep their two barns spanking clean. “When things are in order, it’s just better for the hens’ well-being,” says Nelson. “And it just creates an atmosphere you enjoy coming to each morning.”

Their farm is truly a family operation: While Nelson manages the laying barns and crop-farms, Susan manages the books and helps pack eggs with their two daughters. Two of their three sons help run the family’s manure-hauling business.

Having the steady income and streamlined operations of an egg farm gives the Sensenigs the flexibility to do other activities, such as taking time away to go on mission trips with their church.

“Nellie’s Cage-Free has been a good company to work with,” adds Nelson. “They’re family oriented, and that comes through in our relationships.”

Breckbill Farm

Breckbill Family Farm

Lancaster, PA

Breckbill Family Farm

Lancaster, PA


Work Life and Home Life in Balance

When David Breckbill checks in on his hens every morning, the first thing he does is listen.  “I can tell they’re healthy by the noises they make,” he explains.  “When they’re happy, it gets really loud in there, because they’re singing!”

David, his wife Janelle, and their four children consider those noisy Nellie’s hens part of the family.  In fact, their cage-free laying barn is just a few hundred yards from their own front door. The kids take turns helping their parents pack eggs every day, and the hens love to watch them work, from a window in their barn.   (Their hens, they’ve found, are curious about everything.)

For David, who made a full recovery from a backbreaking fall in 2012, it’s a blessing to continue the hard, satisfying work of family farming. Today he balances his farm duties with his work at a local flooring company, while Janelle and the children help manage the hens and pack eggs.

The Breckbills bought their farm from Janelle’s parents, and they’re determined to keep the family farm tradition going. They’re looking forward to adding a second laying barn soon, and having David come home full-time to farm.  “We’re all about family and doing things together,” says Janelle.


Our Small Family Farms, by State

Illinois

  • Hostetler Family Farm
  • Miller Family Farm

Indiana

  • 4 Woods Family Farm
  • Maulberry Family Farm
  • Schlabach Family Farm
  • Schwartz Family Farm
  • Shady Creek Family Farm
  • Therapy Lane Family Farm
  • Winding Creek Family Farm

Maine

  • Martin Family Farm

New Hampshire

  •  P. Ward Family Farm
  • Laflamme Family Farm

New York

  • Latremore Family Farm
  • L. Burkholder Family Farm

Ohio

  • B. Troyer Family Farm
  • L. Troyer Family Farm
  • Brumme Family Farm
  • E. Burkholder Family Farm
  • King Family Farm
  • Zimmerman Family Farm

Pennsylvania

  • Bomgardner Family Farm
  • Beiler Family Farm
  • Bogart Family Farm
  • Breckbill Family Farm
  • Cook Family Farm
  • Dersham Family Farm
  • Dunkelberger Family Farm
  • Ewing Family Farm
  • Fischer Family Farm
  • Good Family Farm
  • High Family Farm
  • E. Hoover Family Farm
  • L. Hoover Family Farm
  • Horst Family Farm
  • Hurst Family Farm
  • King Family Farm
  • Lehman Family Farm
  • J. Martin Family Farm
  • W. Martin Family Farm
  • Musser Family Farm
  • Nolt Family Farm
  • N. Sensenig Family Farm
  • D. Sensenig Family Farm
  • Shepperson Family Farm
  • Siegrist Family Farm
  • Slaymaker Family Farm
  • Stoltzfus Family Farm
  • Weaver Family Farm
  • Wenger Family Farm
  • Zimmerman Family Farm
  • Zook Family Farm

Vermont

  • Miller Family Farm
  • Bullock Brother’s Farm