Pete and Gerry’s Organic Eggs ARE NOT affected by egg recall. See Details »
Organic Soft Boiled Egg on Salad

Are Eggs Healthy?

Eggs are healthy. You just can’t say that.

Virtually everyone knows that eggs are nutritious. They are one of the healthiest, nutrient-dense, natural foods that you can find. Eggs are one of the most complete sources of protein available. They boast generous amounts of Omega-3 and contain all of the essential amino acids your body needs to build and repair muscles. They contain lutein, zeaxanthin, and choline. I could go on, seriously. All of that, for a slender 75 calories per egg.

But we can’t say that eggs are healthy. Not legally, not on the package. And we can’t tell people that they are “nutritious” or even “safe.” One of nature’s most perfect foods, and we can’t recommend that people eat it. Additional things that egg producers cannot say about their product include: “good for you,” “part of a healthy diet,” or “healthful.”

They will, however, allow us to say that they taste good. Which is nice.

Why can’t we say eggs are healthy?

If this seems like a triumph of well-intentioned consumer protection efforts over simple common sense, we would agree.

The original reasoning behind this policy goes back to the 1950s. The link between high cholesterol levels in the blood and health problems, like heart disease, was established by the now famous Framingham Heart Study beginning in 1948. But the USDA went further to make an unsupported conclusion that ingesting any food high in cholesterol would, in turn, drive up the levels of cholesterol in the blood, and thus should be avoided.

It turns out not all foods behave the same way in the body. Subsequent reviews of this study, and of numerous, more current studies, have revealed no evidence that egg consumption actually elevates cholesterol within blood levels. Thus, no correlation with increased disease risk can be drawn. You can read more about that here.

The USDA is not the only agency involved of course. The FDA also plays a significant role in the inspection of shelled eggs, as well as issues broad guidelines for all food products as to what can or cannot be labeled “healthy.”

Will they change the rule?

In recognition of the improved science and understanding around eggs, the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, co-developed by the USDA and the Department of Health and Human Services, eliminated their opposition to dietary cholesterol. Thus, eggs were no longer identified as a concern for overconsumption.

In fact, Karen DeSalvo, HHS assistant secretary for health, stated this at the time: “Eggs can be part of a healthy eating pattern and people should be thoughtful about including them into a healthy routine.”

That sounds promising. The FDA is currently reviewing their rules for what constitutes a “healthy” nutrient claim on food labeling as well. It seems that the science is catching up to the policy, ever so slowly. Today, eggs remain guilty of “misleading advertising” if they try to promote their considerable nutrition and health benefits, but hopefully soon, that will no longer be the case.

What are your thoughts regarding eggs and health benefits? Let us know in the comments below.

The featured image on this post comes from Reclaiming Yesterday, a member of our ambassador program. Click here to try the recipe.

Pete and Gerry's Caged Hen

What the end of the OLPP rule means for your organic food

The OLPP rule was created to ensure your organic food met the standards you’ve come to expect. That rule was just overturned. Here’s what you need to know.

It probably comes as a little surprise to anyone who reads this blog that the Trump Administration is hostile to small businesses, to everyday consumers, and to, well, animals. On December 15, 2017, they made official what everyone knew was coming: they killed the Organic Livestock and Poultry Practices (OLPP) rule.

Read more in this Washington Post article.

A quick review of the OLPP Rule:

The OLPP rule was developed to close a significant gap in the original USDA Organic Standards, between consumer expectations and industry practice. This gap allowed unscrupulous producers to sell cheap organic eggs and meat by raising them in factory farm conditions. As long as the feed was organic, it didn’t matter if the animals were badly cramped and grossly mistreated.

OLPP sought to update the standards such that consumers who paid more for Organic got what they expected: humane treatment and healthy living conditions. It also sought to protect small, responsible farms that were already maintaining high standards of animal care to be able to compete with the rock-bottom prices of Big Ag Organic.

The rule was seven years in the making, going from conception, through public review, and final passage by the Obama Administration in 2016. It was the definition of a thoughtful, democratic process and should have been left in place. Out of the 47,000 public comments made about the proposed rule change, 99.9% were in favor of it.

Just 27 individual comments were opposed to the new rule. These were obviously 27 very powerful voices, however, because the Trump Administration instantly sided with this infinitesimal fraction of the country upon taking office. As Brian Levin of Perky Jerky said: “it’s just about getting the fat cat fatter.”

The results of the decision to kill the OLPP rule

The tragedy here is manifold. There are the small farmers, like those we work with every day, who will continue to have to try to absorb the actual costs of responsible farming, while their giant competitors ignore those costs. And, there are the consumers who are becoming increasingly mistrustful of the USDA Organic seal. This is so unfortunate because so many things about this voluntary standard remain important and meaningful. But it’s no wonder that trust is eroding with decisions like this one.

For now, we will keep up the fight. The Organic Trade Association (OTA) has filed a lawsuit to see if a court will reverse this egregious abuse of power and process. Pete and Gerry’s Organic Eggs will continue to offer Certified Humane Free Range, Organic eggs that meet and exceed the expectations of our customers.

And you can help too; by learning which Organic eggs are following the spirit of the rules, and which are not. Share that knowledge with your friends and family. One way to know is to look for the Certified Humane symbol, the most respected third-party animal welfare certifier in the U.S.

Pete and Gerry’s Organic Eggs not affected by egg recall!

Over 200 million eggs have been recalled recently by another company due to a concern over Salmonella stemming from a single Rose Acre Farms location in North Carolina.

None of our eggs are part of this recall as we would never produce eggs on a factory farm of that size or style. If you’re concerned about eggs you purchased recently, see what brands have been recalled.

Pete and Gerry’s Organic Eggs are produced responsibly and safely on small family farms. Learn more about why our eggs are different.